davematthews

Silly

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laboratoryequipment:

Google Makes High-Tech Contacts for DiabeticsBrian Otis gingerly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors. It’s ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wirelessly transmit them to a handheld device."It doesn’t look like much, but it was a crazy amount of work to get everything so very small," he says.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/google-makes-high-tech-contacts-diabetics

Amazing

laboratoryequipment:

Google Makes High-Tech Contacts for Diabetics

Brian Otis gingerly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors. It’s ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wirelessly transmit them to a handheld device.

"It doesn’t look like much, but it was a crazy amount of work to get everything so very small," he says.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/google-makes-high-tech-contacts-diabetics

Amazing

laboratoryequipment
laboratoryequipment:

Engineer Finds Solution for Pesticide DriftIt’s a problem that plagues farmers and haunts environmentalists: how to reduce pesticide applications and ensure they are used most effectively. A Cornell engineer has come up with a novel, high-tech solution, using ultrasound sensors to better match sprays to their vineyard and orchard targets.Traditional sprayers deliver a constant amount of spray along a row and are a poor match for the natural variation within an orchard or vineyard. Droplets can also “drift” nine to 10 rows away from their intended canopy targets, carrying pesticides – and the grower’s investment – into unwanted places, including waterways, neighboring property or sensitive crops.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/engineer-finds-solution-pesticide-drift

Sounds awesome but expensive

laboratoryequipment:

Engineer Finds Solution for Pesticide Drift

It’s a problem that plagues farmers and haunts environmentalists: how to reduce pesticide applications and ensure they are used most effectively. A Cornell engineer has come up with a novel, high-tech solution, using ultrasound sensors to better match sprays to their vineyard and orchard targets.

Traditional sprayers deliver a constant amount of spray along a row and are a poor match for the natural variation within an orchard or vineyard. Droplets can also “drift” nine to 10 rows away from their intended canopy targets, carrying pesticides – and the grower’s investment – into unwanted places, including waterways, neighboring property or sensitive crops.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/engineer-finds-solution-pesticide-drift

Sounds awesome but expensive

laboratoryequipment
laboratoryequipment:

Special Yeast Reduces Alcohol, Improves WineA team of Australian researchers has taken a giant step towards controlling a growing problem in the wine community. They have identified special yeast that produce a lower level of alcohol, helping to preserve the flavor. Their research is published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology’ journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.The alcoholic content of wine has crept gradually northward in the last 10-15 years, from 12-12.5 percent to beyond 15 percent. What might sound trivial to aficionados of hard liquor is seen by some oenophiles as a disturbing trend, threatening the flavor and character of some wines. That, plus issues of public health, as well as taxes (in some countries, on alcoholic content), have created a need for approaches to lowering alcohol content.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/special-yeast-reduces-alcohol-improves-wine

laboratoryequipment:

Special Yeast Reduces Alcohol, Improves Wine

A team of Australian researchers has taken a giant step towards controlling a growing problem in the wine community. They have identified special yeast that produce a lower level of alcohol, helping to preserve the flavor. Their research is published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology’ journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

The alcoholic content of wine has crept gradually northward in the last 10-15 years, from 12-12.5 percent to beyond 15 percent. What might sound trivial to aficionados of hard liquor is seen by some oenophiles as a disturbing trend, threatening the flavor and character of some wines. That, plus issues of public health, as well as taxes (in some countries, on alcoholic content), have created a need for approaches to lowering alcohol content.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/special-yeast-reduces-alcohol-improves-wine

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laboratoryequipment:

Loss of Large Carnivores Poses Conservation ThreatIn ecosystems around the world, the decline of large predators such as lions, dingoes, wolves, otters and bears is changing the face of landscapes from the tropics to the Arctic – but an analysis of 31 carnivore species to be published Friday in the journal Science shows for the first time how threats such as habitat loss, persecution by humans and loss of prey combine to create global hotspots of carnivore decline.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/loss-large-carnivores-poses-conservation-threat

How far will we let this go?

laboratoryequipment:

Loss of Large Carnivores Poses Conservation Threat

In ecosystems around the world, the decline of large predators such as lions, dingoes, wolves, otters and bears is changing the face of landscapes from the tropics to the Arctic – but an analysis of 31 carnivore species to be published Friday in the journal Science shows for the first time how threats such as habitat loss, persecution by humans and loss of prey combine to create global hotspots of carnivore decline.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/loss-large-carnivores-poses-conservation-threat

How far will we let this go?